See Me As a Picture Tracks Blog

April 20, 2012


LOVE TOOK MY SOUL

See Me As a Picture From the 2012 compilation
See Me As a Picture

Written by Bret Alexander & The Badlees

The last song is called "Love Took My Soul". I am going to use this one to bring all of my yakkin' full circle. Now, the phrase "took my soul" conjures up images of Charlie Daniels fiddlin' for his life against the devil in "Devil Went Down To Georgia". But, that is certainly not the theme of this tune. To quote Neil Young again, "The same thing that makes you live can kill you in the end." That's pretty close to the theme of "Love Took My Soul". Some people are destroyed by greed, power, paranoia, jealousy, and on and on. But we are all destroyed by something. It might as well be by something you love... In 1999, Paul and I started our studio Saturation Acres. The impetus for that decision was twofold. One, we loved working in recording studios - still do. Secondly, we thought The Badlees were kinda over and we needed a job. We were right...and we couldn't have been more wrong. Those years around the year 2000 were completely bipolar. We had a label, we didn't have a label. We were going on tour, we weren't going on tour. We were gearing up, we were shutting down. Up until about 1997, it had been steady progress. Every year we got more successful than the last. Then the rug got pulled out from under us. But as the song says, "Ain't that the way it goes?" In 1998, I was hoping that I would be off tour long enough to see my first daughter take her first steps. That was 13 years ago and for the most part I haven't missed anything my family has done since. I am sorry, but it is difficult for me to feel like Iife has cheated me. The Badlees didn't become big rock stars. We became parents, husbands, ex-husbands, business owners, record producers, engineers, managers, and teachers. And, guess what? Somehow through all of that we are still a pretty damn good band. Through my work at my recording studio I get to work with alot of young bands. This experience has really helped me appreciate The Badlees more. No matter what this business has thrown at us we keep coming together to make more music. Sure, there were long periods of estrangement and inactivity. But the point is this: These songs are our kids. We are their parents. And that is a life sentence. The author Tom Robbins once said (and I'm paraphrasing); "I get up and write every day. My muse doesn't come to visit me every day. but if she wants to, she knows where to find me." That is what it's all about. You don't have to be brilliant every day. You just have to keep showing up. Eventually you will get a few things right. So who knows where things will go next? We are planning another record and more shows. We'll keep going. And, who knows, perhaps lady luck will have something exciting planned for our future. If she does, she knows where to find us.
   - Bret Alexander       See the Complete Picture

   


April 19, 2012


PROMISES

See Me As a Picture From the 2012 compilation
See Me As a Picture

Written by Bret Alexander & The Badlees

The last two songs to discuss are both new songs. As of this writing we haven't performed either one live. "Promises" is your basic Badlees rock song in the tradition of "Middle Of The Busiest Road" or "Silly Little Man". Instead of getting into a discussion about this particular tune, I'd like to spend this entry (and the next) giving some overall thoughts to sum everything up. First of all, over the last few weeks I have managed to cover songwriting, record production, label deals gone wrong, etc, etc. One thing about The Badlees I didn't talk much about is the band's rhythm section. Pete and I get alot of credit for what we do, as is usually the case with singers and guitar players. I think Pete would agree with that. But Paul and Ron are the foundation of the whole thing. A good drummer and bass player are crucial to any group. Personality-wise they can be pretty crazy people, but when it comes time to make a record they are like monks. They keep walking the same path over and over until they get it right. The drummer is almost always the first one to get fired from a band, bass players run a close second. This is because they are the foundation of the band's music. If the foundation is crumbling, it doesn't matter how pretty the crown molding on the second floor is. The whole house is coming down. Now, I've had the pleasure of working with alot of great bass players and drummers over the years. The thing that makes our rhythm section great is their humility. They serve the song, always. It's not about showing off. To be fair, it doesn't take a virtuoso to play our songs. But I would rather hear a great drummer and bass player laying down a solid groove to one simple song than 10,000 guitar solos. It is a work of art to behold. And it is not easy. Last year I did a session with John Fogarty's piano player, an unbelievable musician and solo artist in his own right. Someone was talking to him and almost making fun of how simple Fogarty's music was and how that must be a drag to play all night. The pianist stopped him immediately and said "John's music doesn't require unbelievable chops. But it does require impeccable taste. That's why I got hired." Bravo. That's how I feel about our guys. It doesn't take a boy genius to play our stuff. But it does take someone who can make great choices. You can't teach that shit.
   - Bret Alexander       See the Complete Picture

   


April 18, 2012


DRIVE BACK HOME

Love Is Rain From the 2009 album
Love Is Rain

Written by Bret Alexander


If you ever find yourself driving west on Route 6 around Tunkhannock and Towanda, Pennsylvania pop on "Drive Back Home" and look around. You will be able to see the backdrop for this song. It's a gorgeous ride. It's the road I take to get to my hometown of Canton, PA. It is the road I took to my father's funeral. It is literally the road that goes over the river and through the woods to grandmother's house. "Drive Back Home" is my favorite song off of Love Is Rain and definitely one of my favorite Badlees songs ever. It was originally supposed to be about a soldier coming home from war. I remember my father talking about coming home in the Vietnam era and how emotional it was to see the "Welcome To Pennsylvania" sign. The last verse was inspired by a special I saw on TV where they were interviewing a veteran of the Normandy invasion. He was speaking about how "it was war" but in the end every one of the boys on that beach was some mother's child and a father's son. By the time I finished the song it became much more universal in theme. I carried it around in my head for a long time before I wrote it down. Basically a song about your past and the ties that bind.
   - Bret Alexander       See the Complete Picture

   


April 17, 2012


WELL LAID PLANS

Love Is Rain From the 2009 album
Love Is Rain

Written by Bret Alexander & Mike Naydock

I love this track. This is a Frankenstein of a tune though. It was written, rewritten, and written again. This is one of my favorite collaborations I have done with Mike Naydock - great lyrical images in there. "Time is like a melody with notes as blue as veins"... that's classic Mike. This song is definitely a studio creation. Paul and I sprinkled tracks on this forever. There's a drum loop, piano, banjo, electric guitar and a kitchen sink full of other stuff. I tracked my vocals 22 times for the gang background parts in the bridge. At one point the song was completely re-recorded from scratch. Alot of musicians shy away from record production. The argument is 1) we won't be able to recreate it live and 2) some of the "soul" of the music gets lost in the recording process. I tend to disagree with that. I have heard lots of soul on Pink Floyd, Beatles, and U2 records. I love Death Cab For Cutie's production style too. There are tons of other examples. Over the years we have tended to let songs and recordings grow organically in the studio, which I feel is the best way to go about it. As long as it works, there is little to no discussion about whether something is or is not our style. However, in the end everything we have done sounds pretty compatible to me. I look at it like being a chef. I just try and make it taste good. If I wouldn't eat it, I don't want to feed it to anyone else. Unfortunely, many of our advisors prefer the chili we used to make in 1995, which is always the curse of any musician who ever had fans. Nostalgia is a bitch for creative people.

But no fan would have ever suggested Paul Simon to make "Graceland" or U2 to make "Achtung Baby" or The Beatles to make "Sgt. Pepper". A musician has to go where he feels drawn to go. Sometimes you end up in a new world, sometimes you end up in the sewer - the process is the same in both cases. You just never know until you get there. This is true for big, enormous bands like Coldplay or humble independent groups like The Badlees. Neil Young said recently, "Whenever I try and preconceive a record of mine it sucks." Neil Young was sued by his label for making records that didn't sound like Neil Young. If that ain't badass I don't know what is.
   - Bret Alexander       See the Complete Picture

   


April 16, 2012


MAGGIE MAY

Lit Riffs From the 2004 soundtrack
Lit Riffs

Written by Rod Stewart & Martin Quittenton

We did this cover of the Rod Stewart classic for an record called Lit Riffs. It was a companion CD to a short story collection where well known writers, critics, etc took famous songs and wrote short stories based a song of their choosing. The story about Maggie May was the only older work in the collection. It was written by Lester Bangs and was, to my knowledge, the inspiration for the collection in the first place. I am pretty sure this was the first Badlees recording that did not have Jeff Feltenberger on it. The first thing we released after his departure. The song got a bit of airplay and we closed our shows with it for a while. It's just a great song any way you look at it.
   - Bret Alexander       See the Complete Picture

   


April 15, 2012


TOO MANY CHANGES

Renew From the 2002 album
Renew

Written by Bret Alexander & The Badlees

In 2002, change was certainly on everyoneís mind. In retrospect, change was the central theme of the entire Renew record. More specifically, what can last after everything changes and falls apart? When everyone else is moving on, do you want to keep going or not? The band was just coming off a 3-year hiatus between records. Most of us had become parents, bought houses, and moved away from each other. We didnít have a major label anymore and the hype that the band was going to become the next big thing was over... through no fault of our own. We had lost all of our momentum in record label hell several years ago. Lots of big scary life stuff, the party was sure as hell over. Paul and I had started Saturation Acres (our recording studio) and we had just produced another regional band that had gotten signed and had everybody buzzing, Breaking Benjamin. So at this point not only werenít we touring the country, we werenít even the biggest band in our hometown anymore. But we did have our diehard fans, our new manager, the studio, and a fresh approach. So we were excited to make some new music. I remember sitting down in my living room one day to work up some ideas. I remember the tune had a lot of chords and it wasnít moving me. I said to myself "too many changes". I scrapped plan A immediately and started playing a simple 2 chord riff, the same riff that is on the record. I loved a Son Volt song from a few years earlier called "Out Of the Picture":

"You may be quite sure you know where youíre going/ But sooner or later youíre out of the picture/ Too many lost names/ Too many rules to the game/ You better find a focus or youíre out of the pictureĒ

Man were we living that tune. So I had the phrase "too many changes...at the same time". Then I came up with the Motowny chorus, "When are we gonna try and get back around", to put some hope in there, which I always try to do. Paul did some real nice touches in the studio and Pete sang the shit out of this one. Itís still a favorite live.
   - Bret Alexander       See the Complete Picture

   


April 14, 2012


SEE ME AS A PICTURE

Renew From the 2002 album
Renew

Written by Bret Alexander & The Badlees

This is one of those tunes the band is really proud of. It's based on the concept that people get frozen in your memory the way they looked or acted like the last time you saw them. I read an interview with Paul Westerberg once where the interviewer asked him if he saw the other members of The Replacements often. Paul replied, "Not much. How much time do you spend with your friends from high school?" I always thought that was a brilliant answer. When you play in a band for a long time, a lot of people want your music to stay the same. There is a nostalgic quality to it. That is counterintuitive for many musicians, myself included. You need to strike a balance between "follow your heart" and "give the people what they want". There was a song on Paul McCartney's last record called "My Ever Present Past". I can only imagine what it must be like for Sir Paul. "I have become many things since I became a picture in your mind". That line sums up the whole tune. Although this song was never a single, the band made this the title track of our first best of collection. We're very proud of this one.
   - Bret Alexander       See the Complete Picture

   


April 13, 2012


HINDSIGHTSEEING

Renew From the 2002 album
Renew

Written by Bret Alexander & The Badlees

This was the first single off of Renew. The main riff may have been very, very loosely based on the Foo Fighters "Everlong". The B section of this one has one of the band's most quoted lines "If memories had equity/I'd be a millionaire". I tried to put that line in about 3 songs before it found a home in "Hindsightseeing". Around the same time we recorded this, Paul and I were producing a young modern rock band called Breaking Benjamin. They were making their first EP and the first single was a tune called "Polyamorous"... which might be a real word but at the time I thought Ben made it up. And I thought that was a cool idea, so I made up my own - Hindsightseeing. Taking a guided tour of your memories and trying to make sense of it all.
   - Bret Alexander       See the Complete Picture

   


April 12, 2012


DON'T LET ME HIDE

Up There Down Here From the 1999 album
Up There, Down Here

Written by Bret Alexander


This was the first single off of Up There Down Here. We recorded it in LA at a studio called Sound City, a very famous room where Nirvana's Nevermind was recorded along with several of Tom Petty's albums and scores of others. This song was written in a batch of tunes that came at the tail end of the Up There Down Here sessions. It was the classic "I don't hear a single" conversation that was going on at the time. There was all sorts of talk like "you don't have enough songs with the title of the song in the chorus" and things such as that. I was listening to Radiohead's "High and Dry" at the time - great song. The chorus of that song is "Don't leave me high/Don't leave me dry" so I paraphrased..."Don't Let Me Hide" and wrote words around that. Blatant yes, but any writer that tells you he hasn't done that in some form is lying. To be sure nothing was left to chance, I repeated that phrase over and over...and over again in every chorus. I even put the title of the album in the B Section - "Up There, Down Here" (we had already named the record when this was written). Actually, I was just pissed off and sick of trying to write a single. I didn't expect the song to get recorded let alone released. It became the only single off of Up There Down Here before we descended into label hell.
   - Bret Alexander       See the Complete Picture

   


April 11, 2012


THINKING IN WAYS

Up There Down Here From the 1999 album
Up There, Down Here

Written by Bret Alexander & Mike Naydock

This is a classic Naydock lyric. Probably the only song in existence about a prepaid funeral. When we finished this song I thought it had the potential to be our "Everybody Hurts" (REM). I remember our label president being really excited about it. It was such a unique idea for a tune and a really pretty track. Our producer Joe Alexander really came through with some gorgeous warm tones in the studio. All the ballads on Up There Down Here sounded great. I think they have held up really well over time. I am quite certain if things had gone according to plan this song would have been a later single off of Up There Down Here, but while we were finishing the record our parent label Polygram was purchased by Seagrams. It was to become the beginnings of Universal Music and by the time the dust settled, every single person that had worked on our record, from label president to radio promo guy had either been fired or moved to another position. We had spent 6 years trying to get a record deal, then another year and a half touring in support of our label debut. Up There Down Here was supposed to be the record to help define what the band was capable of artistically - the next step along the way. Instead we spent the better part of the next year trying to get out of the deal we had worked so hard to get. In interviews, I remember Pete saying that the reason we called the record Up There Down Here was because there were some of the loudest and quietest songs we had ever done on that disc. That was true. But it was also because we had spent so many years onstage and all of a sudden we found ourselves in the audience again.
   - Bret Alexander       See the Complete Picture

   


April 10, 2012


POISON IVY

Amazing Grace From the 1999 album
Amazing Grace

Written by Bret Alexander


So one day I was writing and I had a case of poison ivy from walking in the woods. Not very deep, I realize. But that was the beginning of this tune. I got to thinking about the concept of a vaccination. They feed you a little bit of the disease so your body can build up an immunity to it. So then I applied that concept to relationships. You have to go through some trials and tribulations to be ready for the good stuff that lasts. Bruce Springsteen once wrote "You can't shut off the risk and the pain without losing the love that remains." Same concept. I wrote "Poison Ivy" in a group of songs where I was experimenting with writing songs on instruments I didn't know how to play. I wrote "Poison Ivy" on a cheap tenor banjo, the same one that appears on the recording. Paul and I could barely keep the thing in tune long enough to record it. Bob Scott put some cool piano in the bridge. That was definitely a nice hook. It reminded me of Fleetwood Mac. Paul did a nice vocal stack in the bridge as well. All in all a really cool pop track. We're proud of it. Many of the songs on Amazing Grace were supposed to be demos. Paul, Ron, and I wrote and recorded them in my basement for fun. Up There, Down Here was finished but we were in label limbo. So we started recording more stuff. As it worked out, the record Amazing Grace came out before UTDH. On Amazing Grace everybody wrote and everybody sang. It was way different than River Songs and it threw everyone for a loop. Reviews were mixed. Not because the material was bad, but because it wasn't our usual fare. But I believe when history is written it will be regarded as one of our finest records. The little demos that could.
   - Bret Alexander       See the Complete Picture

   


April 9, 2012


LONG GOODNIGHT

Amazing Grace From the 1999 album
Amazing Grace

Written by Paul Smith


This is a Paul tune. It was the principal single off of Amazing Grace and itís still a big live favorite. The entire Amazing Grace record was made up of demos made in my basement in Wapwallopen, PA. Most of these tunes were tentatively slated to be on the first Cellarbirds record, which didnít come out until several years later. In 1998, the Up There, Down Here record was finished and sitting somewhere in Universalís vaults gathering dust. We had no reason to believe it would ever be released. After we found ourselves in record company limbo for over a year, we decided to try and get released from our contract. That proved to be a formidable task. So there we sat. We couldnít make any progress one way or another. So we decided to release ANOTHER record the same year, the Amazing Grace record, which was an obvious breach of contract but we figured maybe our label would at least take notice of that and shut us down. We mixed the record, sent it off to press, and went about our business. We were released from our label deal the very same day it came out. Within months, we had a new label deal and Up There, Down Here was released, thus ending the push of the Amazing Grace record prematurely. Despite its humble beginnings and short lifespan, the Amazing Grace record with all its styles and textures would inform our production style for the next decade.
   - Bret Alexander       See the Complete Picture

   


April 8, 2012


FEAR OF FALLING

River Songs From the 1995 album
River Songs

Written by Bret Alexander & The Badlees

The original version of "Fear of Falling" didn't have mandolin at all. When the mandolin version started developing, we knew we had something special. The call and response harmonies were certainly influenced by The Band. The arrangement was inspired a bit by the John Hiatt song "Trudy and Dave". The lyric was inspired by the old saying of "it's not the fall that kills you it's the sudden stop". Basically it's a song about living on the edge while knowing damn well someday you are going to pay for it. The road to perdition as they say. It is also a song about growing up... or the resistance thereof. It means different things to me as time passes. One winter day I was sitting at home watching The Winter Olympic Games and "Fear of Falling" came on under a women's figure skating event. Not what the band had in mind but hell, we took it. We play this one every night we do a show. The mandolin we learned the song on we gave to a Hard Rock Cafe in San Antonio, TX. The one on the recording I still own.
   - Bret Alexander       See the Complete Picture

   


April 7, 2012


GWENDOLYN

River Songs From the 1995 album
River Songs

Written by Bret Alexander & The Badlees

In The Badlees 22 year history, we have released 3 songs total with girls' names in the title. "Angeline Is Coming Home", "Sister Shirley", and "Gwendolyn". "Angeline" was about a junkie coming home from rehab and "Sister Shirley" was about a guy searching through California for his runaway sister. Not your typical "girl song" fare. Only "Gwendolyn" bordered on a standard song about a girl. Ironically we released 2 of those 3 songs as singles back to back in 1996 ("Angeline" and "Gwendolyn"), so to some we were that band that wrote about chicks. Oh well. I named this tune after my grandmother, but it is certainly not about her. I like the last verse alot. In musicians circles there is a thing called a "pirate copyright". What that is is this: If you write a song you can put it in an envelope and mail it to yourself. Then down the line if anyone ever steals one of your tunes you can get out the sealed envelope, show the judge the postmark, open the package and play the recording of the tune in question. It's just like mailing yourself a receipt - proof of ownership. I applied that to a scenario where you mail a letter to yourself that tells your significant other how much she pisses you off. Then years later if you break up you can get out the envelope and prove how long you have been sick of her shitty attitude. Of course, you could always just communicate your feelings maturely, but people who handle things that way don't write good songs.
   - Bret Alexander       See the Complete Picture

   


April 6, 2012


ANGELINE IS COMING HOME

River Songs From the 1995 album
River Songs

Written by Mike Naydock & The Badlees

"Angeline" was the first song we learned when we started working out material following The Unfortunate Result of Spare Time, which as I remember, was only a few weeks after that record was released. We started playing it live immediately. Many fans of the band don't realize that "Angeline" is for the most part Mike Naydock's song. None of the band members wrote a lyric and most of the tune was there when it came to us. There are about 2 or 3 songs like that in The Badlees catalog. Most of the time Mike and I collaborate on things but this time it was a case of "if it ain't broke don't fix it". I loved it. The band certainly did alot of arranging and we put together the big outro together. But the nuts and bolts were there. The song gained a little extra notoriety locally because of the lyrics. One local radio station had a contest for prizes called "What In The Hell Is Pete Sayin'?". Grease landed in where? Quintissential what? It was funny. Many have also asked what a "bathtub virgin" is. So here it is folks: In northeastern PA (and I assume in other areas) many Catholic families have a little shrine in their front yard. You take a bathtub and cut it in half. Then you put it up on its side to create a little amphitheater. Then inside you put a statue of The Virgin Mary (or your saint of choice). Decorate to taste. Hence, a "bathtub virgin". Basically it is a lawn ornament. When it came time to make the video for "Angeline" our label asked us for concepts. I started explaining what a bathtub virgin was and how I wanted to incorporate that into the video. The folks in L.A. didn't get the "upside down bathtub" concept at all. So they suggested, "Why don't we get a couple television stars to direct and star in it?" Hell, sure, why not? The CATERING for the video shoot cost more than we had spent on the whole record. Sheryl Crow stopped by with her dog and some of the cast of the show ER stopped in to check out the shoot. We sure as hell weren't in Kansas anymore.
   - Bret Alexander       See the Complete Picture

   


April 5, 2012


LAUGH TO KEEP FROM CRYING

The Unfortunate Result of Spare Time From the 1993 album
The Unfortunate Result of Spare Time

Written by The Badlees

I think the inspiration for this tune, at least the setting of the lyric, was "Sunday Morning Comin Down" by Kris Kristofferson. This tune was on The Unfortunate Result Of Spare Time record, which I think would be unanimously agreed to be the band's least favorite record. There were good songs on there but we were at odds with where the band should go musically at the time. We worked with Jack Pyers as a producer for the first time and he taught us alot about the process of digging into the details of a song. But in the end the whole thing felt pretty forced. "Laugh To Keep From Crying" was one of the tracks that worked though. It was a good combination of rock and jangle that we use to this day. Lots of harmonies, acoustic guitar, dulcimer and some decent electric guitar. It was probably the best precursor of what was to come with our next effort, River Songs.
   - Bret Alexander       See the Complete Picture

   


April 4, 2012


LIKE A REMBRANDT

Diamonds In the Coal From the 1992 album
Diamonds In the Coal

Written by Bret Alexander & Mike Naydock

I don't believe this was the first single off of Diamonds In the Coal, but it was definitely a favorite live. We used to play "Brandy" in the middle of this one. This was our first full length record, so at that time we were doing a lot of that kind of thing to get people to listen to our originals. This is an early collaboration between Mike Naydock and I. The theme of this tune always reminded me of a Van Morrison song. A bunch of young kids partying out by an old coal breaker and realizing full well that this may be the greatest summer of their lives. The song "Diamonds In the Coal" was born out of a lyric in this song. Somewhere I still have the cassette demo of this track.
   - Bret Alexander       See the Complete Picture

   


April 3, 2012


LAST GREAT ACT OF DEFIANCE

It Ain't for You From the 1990 EP
It Ain't For You

Written by Bret Alexander & Mike Naydock

This was a collaboration with Mike Naydock. A very early one at that. "Defiance" is the only tune off of our first EP that we still play live from time to time. Mike came up with the title from that poster depicting a mouse flipping the bird to an eagle that is about to swoop down and eat him. This is just a really awesome working class sort of tune and it still sounds pretty decent to me. The intro and outro riff was ripped from a song I wrote in high school but never recorded. This song fit Pete's voice real well and was the first example of our "roots rock anthem" style of writing that we have revisited tons of times over the years.
   - Bret Alexander        See the Complete Picture

   


March 21, 2012

How does a band sum up 22 years of creating music into one hour? The Badlees can tell you first hand that it was no easy task. Available April 21st, See Me As A Picture: The Best So Far includes 16 tracks that only touch the surface of what the band has accomplished musically over their decades-long career. It also features two brand new tracks which illustrate that the band is currently making their best music. Be sure to check out the bandís blog for details on each of the tracks featured in the collection.

The band has not only seen several music industry trends come and go but, they have also released music in various technological formats dating back to the days of cassettes. See Me gives the fans an easy way to get all of their Badlees favorites, including several tracks that were out of print. All 16 previously released tracks are remastered and can now finally make their way on to your digital device of choice.

The album features the bandís most elaborate artwork to date featuring a 20-page booklet that captures the bandís history with iconic photographs spanning the band's career. It also features 18 "blurbs" about each song written by the band themselves and other figures prominent in the bandís career. The album is not only a good listen, but a good read as well.

So why in 2012 when the Encyclopedia Britannica decides to stop printing physical editions would The Badlees release their most elaborate album art to date? We want to take our fans back to the good oleí days when you feverishly tried to open up the CD (damn those wrappers were tough to get off) and while you were discovering the music in your car in the mall parking lot, you were holding the album in your hand flipping through the artwork.

In honor of the music industry that once was, we are releasing the album in two stages. First, on April 21st we will be releasing the physical CD, complete with the 20-page booklet. Check out the details for the CD release party at Gulliftyís on April 21st. Then, on May 22nd, weíll catch up to technology and have the album available digitally on (iTunes, Amazon, etc.). No worries for our fans outside of Pennsylvania, the physical CD will be available on our website on April 24th.

It was so much fun for us to put this album together and we hope you have a great time sitting in your car listening to this album as well as reading it too. We promise we are making the wrapper as easy to open as we can. NASA engineers are involved!





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